Literarisches Events (in and around Lawrence KS)

  • PATRICIA LOCKWOOD. Lawrence. Thursday, September 11, 7:00 p.m., Spooner Hall, KU Campus.
  • PATRICIA LOCKWOOD. Lawrence. Friday, September 19, 7:00 p.m. Lawrence Public Library. Sponsored by Raven Bookstore.
  • DENNIS ETZEL, JR. & RACHEL CROSS. Lawrence. Thursday, September 25, 7:00 p.m., Raven Bookstore, 6 E. 7th St.
  • TONY TRIGILIO. Lawrence. Thursday, Oct. 2, 4:00 p.m., English Room, Kansas Union, KU Campus. FREE.
  • CALEB PUCKETT & JUSTIN RUNGE. Lawrence. Thursday, October 16, 7:00 p.m., Raven Bookstore, 6 E. 7th St.
  • BEN LERNER. Kansas City, MO. Thursday, October 23, 7:00 p.m., Epperson Auditorium, Vanderslice Hall on the KCAI campus, 4415 Warwick Blvd.
  • KRISTIN LOCKRIDGE & ROBERT DAY. Lawrence. Thursday, December 4, 7:00 p.m., Raven Bookstore, 6 E. 7th St.

Friday, February 22, 2008

Pre-Wax Museum

I'm using The New American Poetry in my "Poetry Since 1945" class this semester, amongst others. But it's a far less interesting book than The Young American Poets, ed. Paul Carroll (Chicago: Follett Publishing Company, 1968). In addition to the fascinating photos of all these folks as youngsters, it contains a (now-inconceivable) cross-section of US writers. Marvin Bell & Ted Berrigan. Kathleen Fraser next to Louise Gluck.  Robert Hass and Robert Kelly. Charles Simic , Kathleen Spivack, Mark Strand, James Tate (well-groomed, overfed, button-down oxford shirt) in rapid succession; then, later, Julia Vinograd (Berkeley street character, when I was there), Diane Wakoski, and Anne Waldman (also looking mighty clean-cut).  And lots of understandably unknowns as well as some whacky surprises. Anyway, it's always great to find a document of how things were, in any generation, before competing canonical scleroses impair aesthetic cognition, as they always do do, it seems.

1 comment:

K. Silem Mohammad said...

Carroll's was the first anthology of contemporary poetry I ever came across, at my city library--it was my first exposure to Padgett, Coolidge, R. Johnson, all those people. It had an electrifying effect. I found a used copy again a couple years ago, and even though some of the material in it seems a little dull now (not the poets mentioned above, of course), it remains an important book to me.